Gale and Ira Drukier Institute for Children's Health

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Neonatal Genetic Delivery of Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Antibody by Non-Human Primate-Based Adenoviral Vector to Provide Protection against RSV.

TitleNeonatal Genetic Delivery of Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Antibody by Non-Human Primate-Based Adenoviral Vector to Provide Protection against RSV.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsGomi R, Sharma A, Wu W, Worgall S
JournalVaccines (Basel)
Volume7
Issue1
Date Published2018 Dec 29
ISSN2076-393X
Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Immunoprophylaxis with the anti-RSV monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, reduces the risk for RSV-related hospitalizations, but its use is restricted to high-risk infants due to the high costs. In this study, we investigated if genetic delivery of anti-RSV antibody to neonatal mice by chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 expressing the murine form of palivizumab (AdC7αRSV) can provide protection against RSV. Intranasal and intramuscular administration of AdC7αRSV to adult mice resulted in similar levels of anti-RSV IgG in the serum. However, only intranasal administration resulted in detectable levels of anti-RSV IgG in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Intranasal administration of AdC7αRSV provided protection against subsequent RSV challenge. Expression of the anti-RSV antibody was prolonged following intranasal administration of AdC7αRSV to neonatal mice. Protection against RSV was confirmed at 6 weeks of age. These data suggest that neonatal genetic delivery of anti-RSV antibody by AdC7αRSV can provide protection against RSV.

DOI10.3390/vaccines7010003
Alternate JournalVaccines (Basel)
PubMed ID30597977
Grant ListR21 AI113801 / GF / NIH HHS / United States