Gale and Ira Drukier Institute for Children's Health

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Maternal Immunization Confers Protection to the Offspring against an Attaching and Effacing Pathogen through Delivery of IgG in Breast Milk.

TitleMaternal Immunization Confers Protection to the Offspring against an Attaching and Effacing Pathogen through Delivery of IgG in Breast Milk.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsCaballero-Flores G, Sakamoto K, Zeng MY, Wang Y, Hakim J, Matus-Acuña V, Inohara N, Núñez G
JournalCell Host Microbe
Volume25
Issue2
Pagination313-323.e4
Date Published2019 Feb 13
ISSN1934-6069
Abstract

Owing to immature immune systems and impaired colonization resistance mediated by the microbiota, infants are more susceptible to enteric infections. Maternal antibodies can provide immunity, with maternal vaccination offering a protective strategy. We find that oral infection of adult females with the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium protects dams and offspring against oral challenge. Parenteral immunization of dams with heat-inactivated C. rodentium reduces pathogen loads and mortality in offspring but not mothers. IgG, but not IgA or IgM, transferred through breast milk to the intestinal lumen of suckling offspring, coats the pathogen and reduces intestinal colonization. Protective IgG largely recognizes virulence factors encoded within the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, including the adhesin Intimin and T3SS filament EspA, which are major antigens conferring protection. Thus, pathogen-specific IgG in breast milk induced during maternal infection or immunization protects neonates against infection with an attaching and effacing pathogen.

DOI10.1016/j.chom.2018.12.015
Alternate JournalCell Host Microbe
PubMed ID30686564
PubMed Central IDPMC6375740
Grant ListR01 DK091191 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007517 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK034933 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK095782 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32 DK094775 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States